Posts Tagged ‘google’

The road to ruin

July 13, 2019

This is, I believe, an important piece and should be read by all who value liberty and free speech. The argument relates to the organised attack by Social Justice Warriors on any content posted online that does not conform to their world view and to the cowardice and political bias of platform providers who tamely cave in to the bullying of that noisy minority and remove content expressing truly diverse points of view.

The Road To Ruin was orininally posted by Aragmar on Minds.com on 29 May, 2019

The Road To Ruin

Many of you might not agree with what I am about to say, but I have to say it once and for all. There are some people who calmly stand by and continue buying Politically Correct(TM) content created by hardcore SJW ideologues while accidentally mentioning “Why/How is this happening to my favorite IP?” There is the vain hope deep inside, that some of those polished turds that you buy might still “be as good as it once was”, while new, original content creators, who go out of their way to actually stand up against this degeneracy are barely scraping by. Do you see anything wrong in this picture?

No, it isn’t the SJW’s who are ruining your hobbies and favorite game/movie franchises, or at least not entirely their fault – it is you, who continuously spend your hard earned cash and feed those intellectual parasites. There are plenty of people who complain about our horrendous current state of affairs concerning the entertainment industry. Films, books, comics, and games are constantly under attack, by an unrelenting mob of angry and underachieving people, who hate themselves, others and want to destroy everything that is even remotely fun, making all of us equally miserable.

Let us examine this “hypothetical” situation:

– A person surfs the web, notices new author/s who had created something original, be it a game, book or a comic and it is plain as daylight that this new creation goes against the PC religion. The person then admires that new creation, maybe even comments on how brave the author/s were to stand up against the status quo… and then casually walks by. A week, or month passes and the new polished turd comes out of the bowels of Hollywood/EA etc. The person starts protesting as loudly as they possibly can, but the damage is done and none of the SJW cultists care about them complaining about it. They did their job – another day, another franchise “corrected”. Onwards they go bravely in search of more words to be triggered by, offended, claim higher victim status all the while snorting pixie dust and chasing unicorns.

The person suddenly remembers, oh wait, there was something very similar and maybe even better than this shit I spend my money on. They scour the net for days, yet to no avail – that new and original content that they had passed by is nowhere to be found. Weeks later they luckily found a copy and hungrily devour it, instantly realizing that despite its somewhat lackluster wrapping, it is a good product. Best of all – there is not a shred of the dreaded PC religion in it! Quickly they feverishly continue searching, asking friends and others for the next chapter/book or part of the game, only to find out there won’t be one. Never… The author/s were either pushed out of the platform, silenced, censored or bullied out of existence, yet had they received some support, any support, things might have been different. The person laments for a while the tragic loss, of what could’ve been perhaps an alternative to their long-lost, destroyed by the SJW cultists favorite IP. Probably vows to change their ways and support the next new original content that they stumble upon, realizing that those author/s who are willing to fight the uphill battle against the establishment are few. Fewer even are the individuals, who actually manage to pull their scarce resources, and against all odds actually, put a product out.

And now let me ask you a question – do you know such a person? If yes, please, for the love of all that is geeky, nerdy and FUN, do not be like that person!

The more of us who vote with their wallets, the more will that massive, angry mob of fun-hating SJW cultists will lose their backing. Next time when you stumble upon something new and exciting book, game or comic – Share it! Share, with as many people you can, and if not buy one for yourself giving the creator/s the life-sustaining support that they desperately need, others might. Remember, the cancer of Political Correctness(TM) and its ideologues the SJW cultists are only strong because of OUR inaction, or actions.

And if you, continue backing products/creators who are known to be heavily influenced or outright sullied by their incessant push for mass indoctrination – don’t cream afterwards “They are destroying my beloved franchise!”

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Nothing Can Stop Google. DuckDuckGo Is Trying Anyway.

January 16, 2019

Extract from: Nothing Can Stop Google, Duck Duck Go Is Trying Anyway on Medium.com

The excerpt is longer than ‘fair use’ normally permits, but if it helps people to understand there are alternatives out there to the increasingly evil search service provided by Google, the author will not mind too much.

All photos: Monique Jaques

2019 may finally be the year for ‘The Search Engine That Doesn’t Track You’

In late November, hotel conglomerate Marriott International disclosed that the personal information of some 500 million customers — including home addresses, phone numbers, and credit card numbers — had been exposed as part of a data breach affecting its Starwood Hotels and Resorts network. One day earlier, the venerable breakfast chain Dunkin’ (née Donuts) announced that its rewards program had been compromised. Only two weeks before that, it was revealed that a major two-factor authentication provider had exposed millions of temporary account passwords and reset links for Google, Amazon, HQ Trivia, Yahoo, and Microsoft users.

These were just the icing on the cake for a year of compromised data: Adidas, Orbitz, Macy’s, Under Armour, Sears, Forever 21, Whole Foods, Ticketfly, Delta, Panera Bread, and Best Buy, just to name a few, were all affected by security breaches.

Meanwhile, there’s a growing sense that the tech giants have finally turned on their users. Amazon dominates so many facets of the online shopping experience that legislators mayhave to rewrite antitrust law to rein them in. Google has been playing fast and loose with its “Don’t Be Evil” mantra by almost launching a censored search engine for the Chinese government while simultaneously developing killer A.I. for Pentagon drones. And we now know that Facebook collected people’s personal data without their consent, let companies such as Spotify and Netflix look at users’ private messages, fueled fake news and Donald Trump, and was used to facilitate a genocide in Myanmar.

The backlash against these companies dominated our national discourse in 2018. The European Union is cracking down on anticompetitive practices at Amazon and Google. Both Facebook and Twitter have had their turns in the congressional hot seat, facing questions from slightly confused but definitely irate lawmakers about how the two companies choose what information to show us and what they do with our data when we’re not looking. Worries over privacy have led everyone from the New York Times to Brian Acton, the disgruntled co-founder of Facebook-owned WhatsApp, to call for a Facebook exodus. And judging by Facebook’s stagnating rate of user growth, people seem to be listening.

For Gabriel Weinberg, the founder and CEO of privacy-focused search engine DuckDuckGo, our growing tech skepticism recalls the early 1900s, when Upton Sinclair’s novel The Jungle revealed the previously unexamined horrors of the meatpacking industry. “Industries have historically gone through periods of almost ignorant bliss, and then people start to expose how the sausage is being made,” he says.

Gabriel Weinberg, DuckDuckGo CEO and Founder

This, in a nutshell, is DuckDuckGo’s proposition: “The big tech companies are taking advantage of you by selling your data. We won’t.” In effect, it’s an anti-sales sales pitch. DuckDuckGo is perhaps the most prominent in a number of small but rapidly growing firms attempting to make it big — or at least sustainable — by putting their customers’ privacy and security first. And unlike the previous generation of privacy products, such as Tor or SecureDrop, these services are easy to use and intuitive, and their user bases aren’t exclusively composed of political activists, security researchers, and paranoiacs. The same day Weinberg and I spoke, DuckDuckGo’s search engine returned results for 33,626,258 queries — a new daily record for the company. Weinberg estimates that since 2014, DuckDuckGo’s traffic has been increasing at a rate of “about 50 percent a year,” a claim backed up by the company’s publicly available traffic data.

Just before DuckDuckGo’s entrance sits a welcome mat that reads, “COME BACK WITH A WARRANT.”

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“You can run a profitable company — which we are — without [using] a surveillance business model,” Weinberg says. If he’s right, DuckDuckGo stands to capitalize handsomely off our collective backlash against the giants of the web economy …

READ ALL >>>

2019 may finally be the year for ‘The Search Engine That Doesn’t Track You’

All photos: Monique Jaques

In late November, hotel conglomerate Marriott International disclosed that the personal information of some 500 million customers — including home addresses, phone numbers, and credit card numbers — had been exposed as part of a data breach affecting its Starwood Hotels and Resorts network. One day earlier, the venerable breakfast chain Dunkin’ (née Donuts) announced that its rewards program had been compromised. Only two weeks before that, it was revealed that a major two-factor authentication provider had exposed millions of temporary account passwords and reset links for Google, Amazon, HQ Trivia, Yahoo, and Microsoft users.

These were just the icing on the cake for a year of compromised data: Adidas, Orbitz, Macy’s, Under Armour, Sears, Forever 21, Whole Foods, Ticketfly, Delta, Panera Bread, and Best Buy, just to name a few, were all affected by security breaches.

Meanwhile, there’s a growing sense that the tech giants have finally turned on their users. Amazon dominates so many facets of the online shopping experience that legislators mayhave to rewrite antitrust law to rein them in. Google has been playing fast and loose with its “Don’t Be Evil” mantra by almost launching a censored search engine for the Chinese government while simultaneously developing killer A.I. for Pentagon drones. And we now know that Facebook collected people’s personal data without their consent, let companies such as Spotify and Netflix look at users’ private messages, fueled fake news and Donald Trump, and was used to facilitate a genocide in Myanmar.

The backlash against these companies dominated our national discourse in 2018. The European Union is cracking down on anticompetitive practices at Amazon and Google. Both Facebook and Twitter have had their turns in the congressional hot seat, facing questions from slightly confused but definitely irate lawmakers about how the two companies choose what information to show us and what they do with our data when we’re not looking. Worries over privacy have led everyone from the New York Times to Brian Acton, the disgruntled co-founder of Facebook-owned WhatsApp, to call for a Facebook exodus. And judging by Facebook’s stagnating rate of user growth, people seem to be listening.

For Gabriel Weinberg, the founder and CEO of privacy-focused search engine DuckDuckGo, our growing tech skepticism recalls the early 1900s, when Upton Sinclair’s novel The Jungle revealed the previously unexamined horrors of the meatpacking industry. “Industries have historically gone through periods of almost ignorant bliss, and then people start to expose how the sausage is being made,” he says.

Gabriel Weinberg, DuckDuckGo CEO and Founder

This, in a nutshell, is DuckDuckGo’s proposition: “The big tech companies are taking advantage of you by selling your data. We won’t.” In effect, it’s an anti-sales sales pitch. DuckDuckGo is perhaps the most prominent in a number of small but rapidly growing firms attempting to make it big — or at least sustainable — by putting their customers’ privacy and security first. And unlike the previous generation of privacy products, such as Tor or SecureDrop, these services are easy to use and intuitive, and their user bases aren’t exclusively composed of political activists, security researchers, and paranoiacs. The same day Weinberg and I spoke, DuckDuckGo’s search engine returned results for 33,626,258 queries — a new daily record for the company. Weinberg estimates that since 2014, DuckDuckGo’s traffic has been increasing at a rate of “about 50 percent a year,” a claim backed up by the company’s publicly available traffic data.

Just before DuckDuckGo’s entrance sits a welcome mat that reads, “COME BACK WITH A WARRANT.”

“You can run a profitable company — which we are — without [using] a surveillance business model,” Weinberg says. If he’s right, DuckDuckGo stands to capitalize handsomely off our collective backlash against the giants of the web economy and establish a prominent brand in the coming era of data privacy. If he’s wrong, his company looks more like a last dying gasp before surveillance capitalism finally takes over the world.


DuckDuckGo is based just east of nowhere. Not in the Bay Area, or New York, or Weinberg’s hometown of Atlanta, or in Boston, where he and his wife met while attending MIT. Instead, DuckDuckGo headquarters is set along a side street just off the main drag of Paoli, Pennsylvania, in a building that looks like a cross between a Pennsylvania Dutch house and a modest Catholic church, on the second floor above a laser eye surgery center. Stained-glass windows look out onto the street, and a small statue of an angel hangs precariously off the roof. On the second floor, a door leading out to a balcony is framed by a pair of friendly looking cartoon ducks, one of which wears an eye patch. Just before DuckDuckGo’s entrance sits a welcome mat that reads “COME BACK WITH A WARRANT.”

“People don’t generally show up at our doorstep, but I hope that at some point it’ll be useful,” Weinberg tells me, sitting on a couch a few feet from an Aqua Teen Hunger Force mural that takes up a quarter of a wall. At 39, he is energetic, affable, and generally much more at ease with himself than the stereotypical tech CEO. The office around us looks like it was furnished by the set designer of Ready Player One: a Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy print in the entryway, Japanese-style panels depicting the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles in the bathroom, and a vintage-looking RoboCop pinball machine in the break room. There’s even a Lego model of the DeLorean from Back to the Future on his desk. The furniture, Weinberg tells me, is mostly from Ikea. The lamp in the communal area is a hand-me-down from his mom.

Weinberg learned basic programming on an Atari while he was still in elementary school. Before hitting puberty, he’d built an early internet bulletin board. “It didn’t really have a purpose” in the beginning, Weinberg says. The one feature that made his bulletin board unique, he says, was that he hosted anonymous AMA-style question panels with his father, an infectious disease doctor with substantial experience treating AIDS patients. This was during the early 1990s, when the stigma surrounding HIV and AIDS remained so great that doctors were known to deny treatment to those suffering from it. Weinberg says that the free—and private—medical advice made the board a valuable resource for the small number of people who found it. It was an early instance of Weinberg’s interest in facilitating access to information, as well as a cogent example of the power of online privacy: “The ability to access informational resources anonymously actually opens up that access significantly,” he told me over email.

After graduating from MIT in 2001, Weinberg launched a slew of businesses, none of which are particularly memorable. First there was an educational software program called Learnection. (“Terrible name… the idea was good, but 15 years too early,” he says.) Then he co-founded an early social networking company called Opobox, taking on no employees and writing all the code himself. “Facebook just kind of obliterated it,” Weinberg says, though he was able to sell the network to the parent company of Classmates.com for roughly $10 million in cash in 2006.

It was around that time when Weinberg began working on what would become DuckDuckGo. Google had yet to achieve total hegemony over the internet search field, and Weinberg felt that he could create a browser plugin that might help eliminate the scourge of spammy search results in other search engines.

Weinberg bought a billboard in San Francisco that proudly proclaimed, “Google tracks you. We don’t.” The stunt paid off in spades, doubling DuckDuckGo’s daily search traffic.

To build an algorithm that weeded out bad search results, he first had to do it by hand. “I took a large sample of different pages and hand-marked them as ‘spam’ or ‘not spam.’” The process of scraping the web, Weinberg says, inadvertently earned him a visit from the FBI. “Once they realized I was just crawling the web, they just went away,” he says. He also experimented with creating a proto-Quora service that allowed anyone to pose a question and have it answered by someone else, as well as a free alternative to Meetup.com. Eventually, he combined facets of all three efforts into a full-on search engine.

When Weinberg first launched DuckDuckGo in 2008 — the name is a wink to the children’s game of skipping over the wrong options to get to the right one — he differentiated his search engine by offering instant answers to basic questions (essentially an early open-source version of Google’s Answer Box), spam filtering, and highly customizable search results based on user preferences. “Those [were] things that early adopters kind of appreciated,” he says.

At the time, Weinberg says, consumer privacy was not a central concern. In 2009, when he made the decision to stop collecting personal search data, it was more a matter of practicality than a principled decision about civil liberties. Instead of storing troves of data on every user and targeting those users individually, DuckDuckGo would simply sell ads against search keywords. Most of DuckDuckGo’s revenue, he explains, is still generated this way. The system doesn’t capitalize on targeted ads, but, Weinberg says, “I think there’s a choice between squeezing out every ounce of profit and making ethical decisions that aren’t at the expense of society.”

Until 2011, Weinberg was DuckDuckGo’s sole full-time employee. That year, he pushed to expand the company. He bought a billboard in Google’s backyard of San Francisco that proudly proclaimed, “Google tracks you. We don’t.” (That defiant gesture and others like it were later parodied on HBO’s Silicon Valley.) The stunt paid off in spades, doubling DuckDuckGo’s daily search traffic. Weinberg began courting VC investors, eventually selling a minority stake in the company to Union Square Ventures, the firm that has also backed SoundCloud, Coinbase, Kickstarter, and Stripe. That fall, he hired his first full-time employee, and DuckDuckGo moved out of Weinberg’s house and into the strangest-looking office in all of Paoli, Pennsylvania.

Then, in 2013, digital privacy became front-page news. That year, NSA contractor Edward Snowden leaked a series of documents to the Guardian and the Washington Post revealing the existence of the NSA’s PRISM program, which granted the agency unfettered access to the personal data of millions of Americans through a secret back door into the servers of Google, Yahoo, Facebook, Apple, and other major internet firms. Though Google denied any knowledge of the program, the reputational damage had been done. DuckDuckGo rode a wave of press coverage, enjoying placement in stories that offered data privacy solutions to millions of newly freaked-out people worried that the government was spying on them.

“All of a sudden we were part of this international story,” Weinberg says. The next year, DuckDuckGo turned a profit. Shortly thereafter, Weinberg finally started paying himself a salary.


Today, DuckDuckGo employs 55 people, most of whom work remotely from around the world. (On the day I visited, there were maybe five employees in the Paoli office, plus one dog.) This year, the company went through its second funding round of VC funding, accepting a $10 million investment from Canadian firm OMERS. Weinberg insists that both OMERS and Union Square Ventures are “deeply interested in privacy and restoring power to the non-monopoly providers.” Later, via email, Weinberg declined to share DuckDuckGo’s exact revenue, beyond the fact that its 2018 gross revenue exceeded $25 million, a figure the company has chosen to disclose in order to stress that it is subject to the California Consumer Privacy Act. Weinberg feels that the company’s main challenge these days is improving brand recognition.

“I don’t think there’s many trustworthy entities on the internet, just straight-up,” he says. “Ads follow people around. Most people have gotten multiple data breaches. Most people know somebody who’s had some kind of identity theft issue. The percentage of people who’ve had those events happen to them has just grown and grown.”

The recent investment from OMERS has helped cover the cost of DuckDuckGo’s new app, launched in January 2018. The app, a lightweight mobile web browser for iOS and Android that’s also available as a Chrome plugin, is built around the DuckDuckGo search engine. It gives each site you visit a letter grade based on its privacy practices and has an option to let you know which web trackers — usually ones from Google, Facebook, or Comscore — it blocked from monitoring your browsing activity. After you’ve finished surfing, you can press a little flame icon and an oddly satisfying animated fire engulfs your screen, indicating that you’ve deleted your tabs and cleared your search history.

The rest of the recent investment, Weinberg says, has been spent on “trying to explain to people in the world that [DuckDuckGo] exists.” He continues, “That’s our main issue — the vast majority of people don’t realize there’s a simple solution to reduce their [online] footprint.” To that end, DuckDuckGo maintains an in-house consumer advocacy blog called Spread Privacy, offering helpful tips on how to protect yourself online as well as commentary and analysis on the state of online surveillance. Its most recent initiative was a study on how filter bubbles — the term for how a site like Google uses our data to show us what it thinks we want — can shape the political news we consume.

Brand recognition is a challenge for a lot of startups offering privacy-focused digital services. After all, the competition includes some of the biggest and most prominent companies in the world: Google, Apple, Facebook. And in some ways, this is an entire new sector of the market. “Privacy has traditionally not been a product; it’s been more like a set of best practices,” says David Temkin, chief product officer for the Brave web browser. “Imagine turning that set of best practices into a product. That’s kind of where we’re going.”

Like DuckDuckGo — whose search engine Brave incorporates into its private browsing mode — Brave doesn’t collect user data and blocks ads and web trackers by default. In 2018, Brave’s user base exploded from 1 million to 5.5 million, and the company reached a deal with HTC to be the default browser on the manufacturer’s upcoming Exodus smartphone.

Google knows that I’m in Durham, North Carolina. As far as DuckDuckGo is concerned, I may as well be on the moon

Temkin, who first moved out to the Bay Area in the early ’90s to work at Apple, says that the past two decades of consolidation under Google/Facebook/Netflix/Apple/Amazon have radically upended the notion of the internet as a safe haven for the individual. “It’s swung back to a very centralized model,” he says. “The digital advertising landscape has turned into a surveillance ecosystem. The way to optimize the value of advertising is through better targeting and better data collection. And, well, water goes downhill.”

In companies such as Brave and DuckDuckGo, Temkin sees a return to the more conscientious attitude behind early personal computing. “I think to an ordinary user, [privacy] is starting to sound like something they do need to care about,” he says.

But to succeed, these companies will have to make privacy as accessible and simple as possible. “Privacy’s not gonna win if it’s a specialist tool that requires an expert to wield,” Temkin says. “What we’re doing is trying to package [those practices] in a way that’s empathetic and respectful to the user but doesn’t impose the requirement for knowledge or the regular ongoing annoyance that might go with maintaining privacy on your own.”


In November, I decided to switch my personal search querying to DuckDuckGo in order to see whether it was a feasible solution to my online surveillance woes. Physically making the switch is relatively seamless. The search engine is already an optional default in browsers such as Safari, Microsoft Edge, and Firefox, as well as more niche browsers such as Brave and Tor, the latter of which made DuckDuckGo its default search in 2016.

Actually using the service, though, can be slightly disorienting. I use Google on a daily basis for one simple reason: It’s easy. When I need to find something online, it knows what to look for. To boot, it gives me free email, which is connected to the free word processor that my editor and I are using to work on this article together in real time. It knows me. It’s only when I consider the implications of handing over a digital record of my life to a massive company that the sense of free-floating dread about digital surveillance kicks in. Otherwise, it’s great. And that’s the exact hurdle DuckDuckGo is trying to convince people to clear.

Using DuckDuckGo can feel like relearning to walk after you’ve spent a decade flying. On Google, a search for, say, “vape shop” yields a map of vape shops in my area. On DuckDuckGo, that same search returns a list of online vaporizer retailers. The difference, of course, is the data: Google knows that I’m in Durham, North Carolina. As far as DuckDuckGo is concerned, I may as well be on the moon.

That’s not to say using DuckDuckGo is all bad. For one, it can feel mildly revelatory knowing that you’re seeing the same search results that anyone else would. It restores a sense of objectivity to the internet at a time when being online can feel like stepping into The Truman Show — a world created to serve and revolve around you. And I was able to look up stuff I wanted to know about — how to open a vacuum-sealed mattress I’d bought off the internet, the origin of the martingale dog collar, the latest insane thing Donald Trump did — all without the possibility of my search history coming back to haunt me in the form of ads for bedding, dog leashes, or anti-Trump knickknacks. Without personalized results, DuckDuckGo just needs to know what most people are looking for when they type in search terms and serve against that. And most of the time, we fit the profile of most people.

When I asked Weinberg if he wanted to displace Google as the top search engine in all the land, he demurred. “I mean, I wouldn’t be opposed to it,” he says, “but it’s really not our intention, and I don’t expect that to happen.” Instead, he’d like to see DuckDuckGo as a “second option” to Google for people who are interested in maintaining their online anonymity. “Even if you don’t have anything to hide, it doesn’t mean you want people to profit off your information or be manipulated or biased against as a result [of that information],” he says.

Even though DuckDuckGo may serve a different market and never even challenge Google head-on, the search giant remains its largest hurdle in the long term. For more than a decade, Google has been synonymous with search. And that association is hard, if not impossible, to break.

In the meantime, the two companies are on frosty terms. In 2010, Google obtained the domain duck.com as part of a larger business deal in a company formerly known as Duck Co. For years, the domain would redirect to Google’s search page, despite seeming like something you’d type into your browser while trying to get to DuckDuckGo. After DuckDuckGo petitioned for ownership for nearly a decade, Google finally handed over the domain in December. The acquisition was a minor branding coup for DuckDuckGo — and a potential hedge against accusations of antitrust for Google.

That doesn’t mean relations between the two companies have improved. As the Goliath in the room, Google could attempt to undercut DuckDuckGo’s entire business proposition. Over the past few years, even mainstream players have attempted to assuage our privacy anxieties by offering VPNs (Verizon), hosting “privacy pop-ups” (Facebook), and using their billions to fight against state surveillance in court (Microsoft). With some tweaks, Google could essentially copy DuckDuckGo wholesale and create its own privacy-focused search engine with many of the same protections DuckDuckGo has built its business on. As to whether people would actually believe that Google, a company that muscled its way into becoming an integral part of the online infrastructure by selling people’s data, could suddenly transform into a guardian of that data remains to be seen.

When it comes to the internet, trust is something easily lost and difficult to regain. In a sense, every time a giant of the internet surveillance economy is revealed to have sold out its customers in some innovatively horrifying way, the ensuing chaos almost serves as free advertising for DuckDuckGo. “The world keeps going in a bad direction, and it makes people think, ‘Hey, I would like to escape some of the bad stuff on the internet and go to a safer place,’” Weinberg says. “And that’s where we see ourselves.”

–>

Google: I told you they were evil

May 7, 2015

Nobody who reads Boggart Blog or Little Nicky Machiavelli can say they have not been warned about how evil Google are, but if you need reminding this story from govtslaves.info has all the information you need.

“Google has managed to boost its revenues by billions of dollars this year by attacking thousands of smaller businesses who make money from affiliate programs. It does this by deliberately favoring large brands in its search results.

“This war is largely secret because very few people understand this shift. Google manages to deflect attention through publicity about projects such as Google+, or its self-driven cars — none of which are revenue generating businesses.

“Yet in its core business, under the renewed leadership of CEO Larry Page, Google has launched an incredibly aggressive strategy targeting mostly small firms. You can see how effective this has been in the following numbers culled from its financial reports.

“For example, for the whole of last year, Google’s revenues from its own sites could barely keep pace with growth in revenues from its AdSense partner network — mostly small firms.”

Read all at govtslaves.info

I’ve been out of action for a few days, nothing to do with election aversion, just a little medical problem. Back to full speed soon.

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Google Driverless Wankermobile Will Be Controlled by Darth Vader

July 17, 2014

FBI warns driverless cars could be used as ‘lethal weapons’

google wakermobile
Google Wankermobile – built for The Dark Side

from The Guardian
Google’s driverless car may remain a prototype, but the FBI believes the “game changing” vehicle could revolutionise high-speed car chases within a matter of years. The report also warned that autonomous cars may be used as “lethal weapons”.

In an unclassified but restricted report obtained by the Guardian under a public records request, the FBI predicts that autonomous cars “will have a high impact on transforming what both law enforcement and its adversaries can operationally do with a car.”

In a section called Multitasking, the report notes that “bad actors will be able to conduct tasks that require use of both hands or taking one’s eyes off the road which would be impossible today.”

The restricted (but not secret) report obtained by the Guardian under a FoI request states that the FBI predicts driverless cars “will have a high impact on transforming what both law enforcement and its adversaries can operationally do with a car.”

Continue reading:

The report states:

One nightmare scenario could be suspects shooting at pursuers from getaway cars that are driving themselves.

The report, written by agents in the Strategic Issues Group within the FBI’s Directorate of Intelligence, says, “Autonomy … will make mobility more efficient, but will also open up greater possibilities for dual-use applications and ways for a car to be more of a potential lethal weapon that it is today.”

Well that certainly proves Guardian writers will be potential customers for Wankermobiles. These monstrosities, (designed for Google by the people who make Kinder Surprise toys) will do a maximum of 20mph flat out. I cannot see how the FBI’s fears that Darth Vader or other intergalatic criminals will want them.

Who the fuck in their right mind other than a middle class, left wing, safety craving wuss would use one as a getaway car?

EU taking on Google – Well One German Publisher Is

July 7, 2014

Those New World Order fanatics at The Guardian, bless them, seldom miss a trick when it comes to promoting the single European Superstate and the globalist agenda. Their latest misrepresentation is to try and make us feel the European Union is somehow protecting our freedoms even as the bureau rats of Brussels are taking them away.

The fight to stop Google grabbing control of all the information in the world is not being led by Junkhead, Van Rompuy-pumpy, Baroness Ashton and the rest (they are pushing the neo-feudal Trans Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership which would enable corporations like Google to override sovereign laws made by national governments) but by a German publishey big German publisherr – a very big and influential German publisher.

Mathias Döpfner  is CEO of Axel Springer SE, Europe‘s biggest newspaper publisher, which owns its bestselling tabloid, Bild. His stated mission declares that Springer should become “the world’s leading digital publisher ” This conflicts just a tad with Google’s  stated mission that their aim is to become the world’s ONLY digital publisher.

Axel Springer prepared to defend their position by introducing a partial paywall for Bild’s online offering, bought  TV news channel N24, and repositioned the print publishing operation behind  flagship broadsheet, Die Welt, so that the web editors now commission content and a team of 12 editors compile the print edition from the online bounty.

Then Döpfner, a former journalist himsel felt it was time to pick a battle with the biggest player in new media: Google.

In April 2014, he lobbed a grenade in the form of an open letter to Google’s executive chairman, Eric Schmidt, in which he accused the Search Engine Giant of operating a business model that “in less reputable circles would be called a protection racket”, and of discriminating against competitors in its search rankings (Google deny this but it is very obviously true). Google’s motto was “if you don’t want us to finish you off, you’d better pay”, he wrote .

Last Wednesday, he told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “We need a simple rule of fair and transparent search criteria, and I think the product that has the highest traffic should be on the top rank and the product that has the lowest traffic should be on the lowest rank. But unfortunately, Google is not respecting that.”
In a speech on Monday, Döpfner went even further, saying that Google was “abusing its dominant position”,  This looks like hypocrisy coming from the head of a media empire which for decades abused its dominant market-position in the German media to impose a reactionary agenda on policymakers, but on the other hand it is no more hypocritical than google whose corporate motto ought to read “Don’t be evil, that’s our job“.

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Google quits Spain in paid content row
]
Spain’s government have defied Google’s vow to shut down its Spanish online news service rather than pay for content, [ … ] The internet search giant threatened to close Google News Spain in December, 2014, before an intellectual property law enters force in January obliging Internet news scrapers to pay for content automatically lifted from other websites. Spain’s culture ministry, said it would go ahead with the new law, Google’s response is “a matter for the company”.


More Cracks in Google’s ‘Don’t Be Evil’ Mantra as Data Collection and Political Power Soar

Google is amassing huge amounts of personal user data while simultaneously accruing big-time political clout, a new report from Public Citizen confirms.

Zombie Apocalypse: Are You Already A Zombie

March 20, 2014

shaun of the dead and friend flee from zombies
Shaun of the Dead with his best mate flee Zombie Apocalypse Picture Source

Have you been zombied yet. Film and TV shows like The Walking Dead and Shaun Of The Dead aren’t quite clear on how the process of Zombiefication works. Some say it is a virus, others suggest its contagion.

Another possibility is that some kind of brainwashing is involved. And the signs are you could easily have been zombied already. If you are one of those kewl, trendy types who has to have the latest gadget, must be an early adopter of any new technology, even before old cynics like me have had chance to warn you how invasive it is, if you can’t see any reason why a sane person would not want an RFID chip implanted in their skull to interface the brain with Google’s servers because it can only be to our benefit to have one of the greediest, most avaricious and most fascistic organisations ever, spoonfeeding you your every thought, you are over half way to being a zombie.

Really RFID tags are so passe darlings and Google Goggles, the eyewear that gets Google right in your face right around the clock can’t really be considered invasive compared to the shit that’s being planned now.

Infinitesimally small cameras contained in a pill will allow you to take high definition 3-D “selfies” of your insides; electronic tattoos that authenticate your body the way a password does, robot mosquitos to inject us all against the latests pandemics imagined up by Big Pharma in their constant quest for taxpayers money (Big Pharma are like Corporate Zombies, effing useless but always hungry) the future is turning out to be creepier Blade Runner said it would be.

The world is bad enough with vast swaths of disconnected, socially incompetent people wandering through it like techno zombies, ignoring the reality, only interacting with their gadgets.

When you dine out look around the restaurant, half the tables are filled with people who aren’t giving their companions half as much attention as they are giving their gadgets. Can’t they engage with humans or are they afraid that if they piss off their smart phone or tablet it might dump them.

Its the same in the theatre or at a gig., people aren’t watching and listening to the actual show while they are there: they are recording it on their smart phone or streaming it to their mates.

But all this tech addiction pales compared to what makers claim will happen when these sad nerds the new “Android Wear” smart watch that was just announced. Check out the commercial for yourself:

It is a gross misrepresentation of course. The first thing that happens when people become addicted to technology is they stop washing and so quickly start to look and smell like movie zombies. Which means you would not see clean, shiny people getting so close. Full Transhumanism is then just a few short steps away.

Android Wear is a hugely unstylish watch-like device that runs Google Now. The commercial shows people literally talking to their wrists all day as the little smart watch feeds them information about every thing they are doing as they go about their daily lives.

Wired is calling it “Google for your Body.”

Google Now is described by the controlling nerds as an electronic “smart” personal/social assistant that, according to the Wikipedia entry on it, “uses a natural language user interface to answer questions, make recommendations, and perform actions by delegating requests to a set of web services.

I can see someone like me getting so infuriated with it that withing two minutes it would be dust. Predictive text caused me to trash a cellphone one because it never once managed to correctly predict the word I wanted to enter next. And Amazon’s wonderful algorithm has never recommended a book I wanted to read although it has recommended many I had already read.

Technology my arse. OK, if you see any technozombies, you’ve seen Shaun Of The Dead, you know what to do to them. Along with answering user-initiated queries, Google Now passively delivers information to the user that it predicts they will want, based on their search habits.” You won’t just be interacting with the Internet anymore…it will be interacting with you. Preemptively. In real time.

Read more on the latest development in Transhumanism

UPDATE: Mad Scientists More Evil Than Genius

When we get down to the nitty gritty most of the technological developments described above are pretty crappy in reality, the technological takeover has always been more hype than substance and the cliche Mad Scientists, the evil genius behind them is more evil than genius. To get a perspective on how evil we only have to compare the much hyped philanthropy of Bill Gates, the public Kumbayaism of Steve Jobs and Apple, the contempt for users displayed by Facebook’s Mark Cocksuckerberg and the evil things being done by the “Don’t Be Evil” Corpoation Google.

A good place to start is by comparing their exhortations to be good citizens and all live together in peace and lurrrrrrrvvvvvvveeeee, with their own attitude and that of their corporations to the duties on citizenship. A good example of this can be found in their tax avoidance arrangements.

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Dave And The Internet Of Things

March 10, 2014

Our revered Prime Minister Call-me-twatface has been talking about the internet of things. Now Cammers probably does not understand this phrase probably but he thinks it’s the future because a scientist told him that’s what progressive people are thinking (and to that scientist I say; I was promised a personal hovercraft by some geek on Tomorrows World forty years ago – WHERE’S MY FUCKING HOVERCRAFT?

The internet of things is the latest buzzphrase among those who think anything that contributes to blurring the line between the real world and the virtual world inhabited by “scientists” and other reality deniers is “kewl”.

internet-things

There are many emerging technologies that have practical applications than the robot fuck buddies and wearable technology of the internet of things but manufacturers and owners of the creepy stuff like Google Goggles or smart watches that report your activities to a server farm.

Supermarkets are introducing smart shelves, homes are getting smart meters which tell the government how much energy you are wasting, and businesses are all finding ways to connect everyday objects to the internet of things with touch screens, QR codes, RFID chips and other sensors.

Google, being the most evil corporation on the planet, are even working on technology to connect our brains to the internet. All this extended connectivity has officially been dubbed the “Internet of Things” – and someone has told he will sound cool if he uses the phrase. Here’s a presser of Dave’s speech made earlier today:

“David Cameron has announced that the world is on the brink of ‘a new industrial revolution,’ where the internet will allow everyday objects like fridges to ‘talk to each other.’
Speaking at a trade fair in Hanover, Germany, the Prime Minister said that ‘the internet of things’ would transform the world, as he announced a package of measures to promote Britain’s position in the global technological race.

“I see the Internet of Things as a huge transformative development – a way of boosting productivity, of keeping us healthier, making transport more efficient, reducing energy needs, tackling climate change,” said Mr Cameron, adding that the world was now “on fast-forward”. Well Dave might want to live in a dystopia where humans are Slaves Of The Machine but count me out.

In fact there isn’t much science involved that has not been around for years, what drives the internet of things is greed, lust for power and control freakery.

The Internet of Things really refers to seemingly ordinary objects that are programmed so they can make “decisions” based on the data they receive. That information helps people learn and grow from the feedback, developers to improve their products, advertisers to better understand their audience, and most amazing of all, for processes to become automated without human interaction. It also helps governments and corporations to nag us to consume more (and thus pay more VAT) and do as we are told because Big Brother is watching.

Recent technology glitches, covert data gathering exercises and hacking scandals demonstrate that personal data is vulnerable, the internet was never designed for the things it is being used for, such security as there was got stripped out when a scientist decided he could do a better job than the computer professionals and nobody has as yet addressed the failings. Governments and corporations have to invest in strong underlying infrastructure or this information is left vulnerable. The problem with that of course is that a secure internet would be far too difficult for scientists, academics and politicians to use although ordinary punters would manage quite well. We were landed with the POS we have now because scientists felts the systems used with ease by process workers, mechanics, clerks, shop, warehouse and distribution staff and even post office counter clerks were too difficult for someone with a PhD.

This question is being debated now, but in the meantime let’s focus on the fun we can have with some very cool new toys.

“My car will tell me when I need to fill the tank, check the tyres and top up the oil but it will not let me exceed the speed limit”
“My fridge will tell me when I need to buy more butter but will lock itself and warn me that I’ve already had my daily safe allowance when I try to get a third bottle of beer”
“My TV will tell me when my favourite programmes are on then automatically switch itself to a channel broadcasting output approved by the government”
My wardrobe will tell me it is the voice of Azazel and I must go out and kill people wearing silly trousers – oh, come to think of it I’ve had one of those for years. I tried to get rid of it once but it threatened to tell the Police National Crime Database where the bodies are buried.

The world is run by insane people doing insane things – John Lennon

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I Told Them Google Are Evil

November 8, 2013

When I said Google were an evil bunch of control freaks hellbent on world domination they called be a conspiracy theorist. When I said the Google corporate motto in full is “Don’t be evil, that’s our job,” they said I was paranoid.

Funny how little things keep creeping out of the woodwork that leave no room for doubt Google and other technology corporations, in collaboration with government security agencies, are creeping toward technology led fascism.

The laptop was the first portable internet-connected device that freed up millions to be stalked by the internet 24/7 rather than chained to the desk eight hours a day. Next was the smartphone, which didn’t really take off until Apple opened it up to developers and allowed the creation of applications that steal you money while fooling you into thinking you are having fun and made the smartphone the oppressive monster it is today. Then came to tablet computer and though Jobs little jobbie was too pricey and too underspecified to appeal to anyone except fanboys and wankers, rival using Google’s Android front end became the choice for business.

Earlier this year Goolge introduced wearable technology in the limited release of Googlegoggles (Google Glass), which proved a step to far for many bar and restaurant owners who sparked a race relations row by banning human / robot hybrids from their premises. The head-mounted display of Google glass puts Google adverts and “suggestions” (you will obey, you will obey) right in your fucking face whatever you are doing.

Now we have smartwatches. Samsung has a smartwatch, and Google, Apple and Microsoft are buying up companies that have patented smartwatch technology or are hiring engineers to create it. Smartwatch technologies are supposed to work in tandem with mobile phones and computers to become the third leg of the “smart” ecosystem. WTF can a smartwatch do that my forty year old Tissot and a bog standard cellphone can’t do for me and I can’t do for myself?

With wearable fitness gadgets that sense heartbeat, pulse, the number of steps you take, and the quality and duration of your sleep, it’s just a matter of time before technology gets in your head … and that is right. where Google are planning on going next. Yes,hardware and software engineers working for the universe’s creepiest and most evil corporations are working on a chip that can be implanted in the skull and interfaced directly with the central nervous system

CNET reports, “Google has a plan. Eventually it wants to get into your brain. ‘When you think about something and don’t really know much about it, you will automatically get information,’ Google CEO Larry Page said in Steven Levy’s book, In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works and Shapes Our Lives. ‘Eventually you’ll have an implant, where if you think about a fact, it will just tell you the answer.’

but what if I don’t want an answer. What if I am thinking about a nice big juicy steak and a glass of Chateauneuf du Pape. I just want to think about them, I don’t want to know the chemical composition. And if I was thinking about Kelly’s boobs how they feel in my hands and Google interrupted there would be mayhem I promise you.

Are you a slave to the machines? Do you run out and buy a new iPhone whenever one is launched? Would you wear Google Glass and have Google in your face all day. Do you feel you must have a smartwatch whatever the fuck they are? Would you like to be able to think of something and have an implantable computer in your head to provide some additional resources to complete your thoughts? Be sure that if your thoughts did not lead to your doing something that would shove a bit of revenue Google’s way, your own thoughts would be overridden by Google’s

“You don’t really want to take Kelly to bed, you want to browse the web and click through on some Google adsense ads…”

YES-MASTER-I-DO-NOT-WANT-TO-TAKE-SARAH-HARDING-LOOKALIKE-KELLY-TO-BED-I WANT-TO-LOOK-AT-SOME-GOOGLE-ADS-I-WILL-OBEY-I-WILL-OBEY …

Technology is on our bodies, and the evil ones want to put it into our bodies! Let’s hope anonymous can hack our heads and release us.

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Google “Evil Empire” Plans To Hijack Your Car

October 11, 2010

We have blogged many times to the effect that the world’s most control freaky corporation is building an evil empire. Did you give Google permission to take pictures of your house or store and share details of your web activity? Thought not.

Did you give Google permission to broadcast details of your purchases to the world? Thought not.

Now Google is planning to hijack your car. In their continuing effort to help neo – nazi governments abolish individualism Google has been testing cars that drive themselves.

So will this give Google control of your movements? You’d be a fool to allow it to. Take a look at what happens when we let a computer system give us directions:

Van Airlifted After Satnav Blunder
The incredible images our link lesads to show the moment a white Opel van had to be airlifted from a mountain – after a satellite navigation system had directed the driver to travel up it.

The driver, 37-year-old Robert Ziegler, was making a delivery to Bergun, Switzerland, using his GPS unit for directions.

Unfortunately, the unit directed Mr Ziegler up a narrow mountain pathway, which he continued to follow until he became well and truly stuck. “I was lost and I kept hoping that each little turn would get me back to the main road,” he said.By the time the satnav had decided it was time to ‘make a legal u-turn’ the van was wedged between a fence and a stone wall.

Imagine the potential for disaster if you let the computer take over the controls.

Now, having read that have a look at our other sat – nav  (below) on the disasters that have hapened when technological failure meets a failure of human intelligence and then ask yourself: If these idiots trusted a computer to give them directions and this shit happened would I really, seriously think of letting an effing search engine control my car. Think here of the man who googled a crossword clue, wild asian ass, and was pointed to a load of Indian porn sites. Think of the time you googled roast quail hoping to find a recipe for the tasty birds and were direcred to a site for paedophile Premiership fooballers. Think of the time you googled Stones and were shown an ad for a beer brewed in Sheffield.

We ask again, seriously would you let those festering gobshites at Google control your car for you?

Another stupid sat nav story
Sat Nav Can’t See The Wood For The Trees
Puffin Up The Power Of SatNav Technology
Google Carjack

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How Google Destroyed the Internet
The idea of the internet was that it would be a communications tool that freed information by making all public domain documents, libraries and archives accessible for everyone. Unfortunately the corporate monopoly men of Google, Microsoft, Apple, Amazon and Facebook and political control freaks had other ideas. They also understood the technolgy while the hippies and liberals ignored professionals warnings that internet systems would become a perfect toool of censorship.</p>